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Switched Network (SN) Configuration Management Plan

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This is a final version of the Switched Network (SN) Configuration Management Plan. This document incorporates comments and feedback received from the Information Technology (IT) Directorate on the Draft SN Configuration Management Plan delivered on December 1, 1997.

Table of Contents

1.0    INTRODUCTION    1

1.1    Purpose    1

1.2    Background    1

1.3    Scope    1

1.4    Document Overview    1

1.5    References    2

2.0    SYSTEM Overview    2

3.0    CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT COMPONENTS    4

3.1    Organizations and Responsibilities    4

3.1.1    IT Services Directorate    4

3.1.2    SN CM Entities    5

3.2    Configuration Identification    6

3.2.1    Select Network Components    7

3.2.2    Uniquely Identify Each Component    7

3.3    Configuration Change Control    7

3.3.1    Define the Change Control Process    8

3.3.2    Maintain Network Configuration Baselines    8

3.3.3    Control Network Changes    9

3.4    Configuration Status Accounting    11

3.4.1    Identify Status Tracking Information    11

3.4.2    Maintain Status Tracking    11

3.4.3    Report Status Tracking    12

3.5    Configuration Reviews    12

3.5.1    Perform Configuration Review    12

3.5.2    Document and Analyze Results    13

4.0    CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT PROCESS    13

4.1    Process Overview    13

4.2    Classification    14

4.3    Evaluation    16

4.4    Modeling and Testing    18

4.5    Implementation    18

5.0    NEXT STEPS    21

5.1    Plan SN CM Implementation    21

5.2    Finalize SN Component Inventory    21

5.3    Establish SN Component Folders    21

5.4    Identify Candidate CM Tools    21

5.5    Establish SN Change Control Board    22

5.6    Train SN Personnel    22

APPENDIX A SAMPLE CM FORMS    23

APPENDIX B CHARTER TEMPLATES    27

INTRODUCTION

This is a final version of the Switched Network (SN) Configuration Management Plan. This document incorporates comments and feedback received from the Information Technology (IT) Directorate on the Draft SN Configuration Management Plan delivered on December 1, 1997.

Purpose

The purpose of this document is to identify and describe a configuration management (CM) process for the switched Network (SN). This plan describes in simple, straightforward terms the processes required to ensure that the inevitable network changes occur within an identifiable and controlled environment.

This document is intended to be a living document. As implements the components of this plan, and to facilitate the every changing state-of-the-art, the SN CM process may need to be refined. Consequently, the final version of this document should itself be placed under configuration management and the respective changes managed accordingly.

Background

XX Agency currently operates and maintains an extensive LAN/WAN. This network is also known as the Switched Network and provides nationwide communications between regional field offices and remote locations.

The IT organization has identified the need for a configuration management plan to control changes to the SN. During emergencies, the SN must be rapidly reconfigured to support the establishment of Field Offices. Currently, informal operational processes followed by each entity involved with the SN are the primary means of controlling SN changes. These processes are frequently undocumented; consequently, the IT organization cannot determine the status of current SN architecture, network component configuration and proposed changes. This plan addresses this deficiency. It establishes a consistent, cross-organizational CM process for the SN architecture and its components. It provides both SN managers and technical personnel the information they need to implement the SN CM activities and their flow.

Scope

The scope of this document is the identification of a top-level configuration management plan for the SN. This plan presents CM activities for the data portion of’ LAN/WAN (e.g., switches, routers, and hubs). Specifically excluded from this plan are network server hardware and operating systems. Section 2 describes the network scope in greater detail.

Document Overview

This document is divided into five (5) major sections, the Introduction, the System Overview, the Configuration Management Components, the Configuration Management Process, and Next Steps. The organization of this document is as follows:

  • Section 1.0 – Introduction: This section presents preliminary information concerning this document. The introduction provides background information about SN, the scope of this document, the organization of this document, and any references utilized in the assembly of this document.
  • Section 2.0 – System Overview: This section presents an overview of the SN architecture.
  • Section 3.0 – Configuration Management Components: This section describes the components of the configuration management process.
  • Section 4.0 – Configuration Management Process: This section describes the configuration management process to be used.
  • Section 5.0 – Next Steps: This section presents recommended activities to ensure successful implementation of the SN CM process.

References

The following references were used in preparation of this document:

  • Cultivating Successful Software Development, Scott Donaldson and Stanley Siegel, Prentice-Hall, 1997.
  • Data Network Diagram, August 20, 1997.
  • Equipment List, undated.
  • Managing the Software Process, Watts Humphrey, Addison-Wesley, 1989.
  • Master Inventory Wide Area Network Routers, September 22, 1997.

SYSTEM Overview

The SN provides LAN/WAN connectivity for the entire organization . It links Cisco routers, T-1 lines, and I-Muxes provide WAN connectivity. Cisco 7000 routers linked by dedicated T-1 lines provide high-bandwidth connectivity between , and sites with heavy WAN traffic (e.g., the Denton NTC). Cisco 4000, Cisco 3000, and Cisco 2500 routers linked by T-1s and I-Muxes support sites with lesser traffic requirements. Figure 2-1 presents the Data Network diagram for the WAN. Within each site, switches and hubs from various manufacturers provide LAN connectivity.

CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT COMPONENTS

This section describes the components of the SN CM process. These components are presented using the conventional CM framework – configuration identification, configuration change control, configuration status accounting, configuration reviews. Section 4 presents how these components will be used in the SN CM process.

Configuration management involves identifying the configuration of a network system at given points in time, systematically controlling changes to the configuration, and maintaining the integrity and traceability of the configuration throughout the lifecycle. The items placed under configuration management include the software and hardware products (e.g., routers and switches) that comprise the network as well as items required to create or maintain these products (e.g., initial routing tables and switch configuration data). Proper configuration management enables an organization to answer the following questions:

  • What is the process for making changes to the network?
  • Who made a change to the network?
  • What changes were made to the network?
  • When were the changes made?
  • Why were the changes made?
  • Who authorized the changes?

Organizations and Responsibilities

The following organizations in the Information Technology (IT) Services Division will be involved in configuration management activities for the :

  • Architecture Group
  • Operation Group
  • Deployment Group

In addition, two CM entities – the SN Change Control Board and the SN Working Group will provide cross-organizational CM control and coordination.

IT Services Directorate

Architecture Group is responsible for the SN architecture and its components. It tests and deploys SN components, modifies existing network components, and identifies potential SN enhancements. Only Architecture Group is authorized to make changes to the SN and its components. Architecture Group will be responsible for the establishment of the Component Folders.

Operation Group is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the SN. It maintains the deployed components of the SN and ensures that the SN is up and operational. The Operation Group Help Desk is the initial point-of-contact for reported network incidents.

Deployment Group is responsible for deploying field office network hardware and integrating them into the SN.

SN CM Entities

The SN Change Control Board (CCB) and the SN Working Group (WG) will provide cross-organizational CM control and coordination.

SN Change Control Board

The SN CCB will be established as a formal approval authority for changes. It primarily exists to control changes to the SN architecture (e.g., deployment of a new piece of hardware); however, any SN issue with significant cross-organizational impact should involve the SN CCB. Written Change Requests (CRs), Impact Assessments (IAs), and meeting minutes will document the CCB’s consideration of an issue.

A Change Request (CR) form will initiate CCB consideration of a change. Typically, Architecture Group will originate most CRs, but any SN organization may submit a CR to the CCB. Upon receipt of a CR, the CCB will request each member organization to research the incident and record its analysis on an IA. These IAs will document the data upon which the SN CCB will have based its decision. The SN CCB will identify the appropriate change resolution activities and will authorize the affected organizations to perform them. The SN CCB will be notified immediately when the actual change has been completed and the configuration status information will be updated accordingly. The decision of the SN CCB and its rationale will be recorded on the CR. The CR will be closed and copies distributed to each member organization. Section 4 presents this process in greater detail. Appendix A contains sample Change Request and Impact Assessment forms.

The SN CCB will be comprised of representatives from the following IT organizations:

  • Architecture Group
  • Operation Group
  • Deployment Group

Each representative must have the authority to commit his or her organization. Since the SN CCB will consider and resolve cross-organizational issues, its Chair should be a person with the authority to mandate actions to the IT organizations. In addition, since final responsibility resides with the CCB Chair, this person will have the authority to mandate or override decisions made by the CCB. Typically, the CCB Chair is a representative from the next level of management. Figure 3-1 graphically presents the organization of the SN CCB. Appendix B contains a template for the SN CCB charter.


Figure 3-1. SN CCB Organization Chart

SN Working Group

The SN WG is a less formal change control organization that coordinates minor SN changes (e.g., changing settings on a particular router) between Architecture Group and Operation Group. The SN CCB delegates this authority to the SN WG to provides a more streamlined CM control mechanism for those changes that do not affect multiple SN organizations. Although the WG is less formal than the CCB, all requests and decisions must still be documented.

An Engineering Request (ER) form submitted to Architecture Group will initiate WG consideration of a change. Typically, Operation Group will originate most ERs, but any SN organization may submit an ER. Upon receipt of an ER, Architecture Group will research the request and record its analysis on the ER. If the request only involves component-level changes, then WG will authorize the changes and the ER will document the decision. If the incident involves more significant architectural changes, then the WG will originate a CR, and the CR Control Number will be recorded on the ER for traceability. The ER will be closed and returned to the originator. Section 4.0 presents this process in greater detail. Appendix A contains a sample Engineering Request form.

The SN WG will consist of the managers of the Architecture Group and Operation Group organizations or their designated representatives. The SN WG may be considered a mini-CCB.

Configuration Identification

Configuration identification (CI) involves identifying the components of the network, uniquely identifying the individual components, and making them accessible in some form. A proper configuration identification schema identifies each component of the network and provides traceability between the component and its configuration status information. Proper configuration identification answers the following questions:

  • What is the configuration of the network?
  • What are the components of the network?
  • What are the versions of the network components?

The major activities of configuration identification are:

  • Selecting network components to be placed under CM control
  • Creating an identification scheme for the components to uniquely identify each individual component

The following sections present the configuration identification activities for the SN.

Select Network Components

This plan addresses the CM of the SN network infrastructure – switches, routers, and hubs. Specifically excluded from this plan are network server hardware and operating systems.

Architecture Group, in conjunction with the CCB, will determine the network hardware components to be placed under CM. The following is a preliminary list of SN network hardware items to be controlled:

  • Cisco 7000 Series Routers
  • Cisco 5000 Series Routers
  • Cisco 4000 Series Routers
  • Cisco 3000 Series Routers
  • Cisco 2500 Series Routers
  • Ascend MAX Inverse Multiplexer
  • I-MUX Dialup
  • CDDI/FDDI Concentrators
  • Networth 4000 Concentrators
  • Bay Stack Hubs
  • Acculan Hubs

Architecture Group, in conjunction with the SN CCB, will determine the network software components to be placed under CM. The following is a preliminary list of the SN network software items to be controlled:

  • HP Open View

    Uniquely Identify Each Component

Applying CI naming involves setting naming standards based on criteria about the component’s location, function, etc. An example may include naming a router based on the location, model, and function, such as B9-C7000-FIN (for this example, a CISCO 7000 router located in building 9, used for Financial communication). The key in CI naming is setting a usable naming standard that can be applied across the entire enterprise of components within the CM scope.

Configuration Change Control

Configuration change control involves controlling and managing the changes to the network. The goal of change control is to establish mechanisms that will help ensure the integrity of the network. Proper configuration change control answers the following questions:

  • What network components are controlled?
  • How are changes to the network controlled?
  • Who controls the changes to the network?

The major activities of configuration change control are:

  • Defining and documenting the change control process
  • Identifying and maintaining network configuration baselines
  • Identifying and controlling network changes

The following sections present the configuration change control activities for the SN.

Define the Change Control Process

At a high-level, the SN change control process consists of the following basic steps:

  • Identifying and classifying a change to the network
  • Evaluating what components in the current network configuration needs to be changed
  • Testing or modeling the impact of the change upon the current network
  • Implementing the change if it is approved.

Figure 3-2 graphically presents the phases and the high-level activities in this process. A more detailed description of each phase and a decomposition of each step’s activities are presented in Section 4.0.


Figure 3-2. SN CM Process Overview

Maintain Network Configuration Baselines

A configuration baseline is the foundation of configuration management. Each baseline captures an approved snapshot of the SN and its components at a given point in time. The conventional configuration management model constructs a system baseline from the top-down. In this single-tiered model, a baseline is comprised of a specific release of each component and any change to any component must be considered and approved by the CCB. However, since the SN is an extremely dynamic network, this top-down model would be very costly to implement and maintain; therefore, the SN will be managed using a two-tier CM model.

At the first-tier SN-architecture level, baseline control will be centralized at the CCB. The CCB will baseline a basic network architecture, e.g. FDDI backbone, Ethernet, Cisco routers, etc., and the CCB must consider and approve any changes to that architecture, e.g., deploying an Ascend router. This will prevent significant network changes from being performed before all affected organizations have been informed and have provided their input.

At the second-tier SN-component level, baseline control will be more decentralized. A component baseline will be established for each SN component that will capture the operational parameters with which that component was evaluated and deployed. Any changes to this baseline, e.g., updating the routing parameters, must be approved by Architecture Group and documented by the person making the changes. Typically these changes will not require CCB approval, but periodic configuration reviews will enable the CCB to monitor component level changes and refine the process if necessary.

This two-tier CM model is shown in figure 3-2 above. This model will ensure that significant network changes to the SN-architecture are performed in a controlled, well-documented manner, while still allowing network engineers to react promptly to ensure effective operation of the network components.

Control Network Changes

Generally, Architecture Group, in accordance with the SN CCB, will control first-tier network architecture changes; while operational procedures will control most second-tier network component changes.

SN Architecture

At the SN-architecture level, only the SN CCB will have the authority to approve and make changes to the components of the SN architecture baseline. Before considering any change, the potential change must be documented using a SN Change Request (CR) form. This form describes the desired change, the justification for the change, the impact of implementing the change, and the eventual CCB decision regarding the change. CRs normally document network changes originating from Architecture Group, but any SN engineer or organization may submit a CR.

The CR will be submitted to the Chair of the CCB who will route the CR to each organization on the SN CCB. Each organization will fill in a SN Impact Assessment (IA) form documenting the impact of the change upon their organization. If an organization will be affected by the change, the IA will be returned with notations or comments documenting the organization’s technical analysis, the impact on the organization’s schedule, cost, and labor resources, and any suggested alternatives to the proposed change. If an organization will not be affected by the change, the IA will be returned indicating «no impact».

The CCB will meet either in person or by teleconference to discuss the change. The CCB will use the IAs and the meeting discussion to decide whether to approve or disapprove the proposed change. The CCB meeting minutes will clearly document its decision and the rationale supporting its decisions. These CCB minutes will be distributed to all CCB organizations and retained in the SN project files.

Figure 3-3 graphically presents the SN CCB process. Appendix A contains sample SN Change Request and SN Impact Assessment forms.

Figure 3-3. SN CCB Process

SN Components

At the SN-component level, a larger number of persons will be able to make changes. Architecture Group, in accordance with the CCB, will identify the specific SN personnel authorized to make changes and the specific changes that each person is authorized to make. The CR process will be used to request and approve changes to this authorization list, but no IAs will be required.

Each SN component will have an associated SN Component Folder (CF) which will be used to track component level changes. Any change, no matter how minor, made to that component must be recorded in the CF. The CF will be started when a component is deployed into the SN and will depict the initial configuration of the component. Subsequent changes to that component will be recorded by the entries in the CF. The CF pertaining to a component may be either hardcopy or softcopy — the critical factor is that the CF be readily available to network personnel. (If it is difficult to enter and update information in the CF, the CF becomes a hindrance rather than a tool and probably won’t be maintained).

Configuration Status Accounting

Configuration status accounting involves the recording and reporting of the change process. The goal of configuration status accounting is to maintain a status record of all items in the network baseline, thus providing traceability of all changes to the network. Proper configuration status accounting answers the following questions:

  • What changes have been made to the system and when were they made?
  • What components were affected by this change?

The major activities of configuration status accounting are:

  • Identifying the configuration status information to be recorded
  • Maintaining a record of configuration changes
  • Reporting the status of network configuration management

The following sections present the configuration status accounting activities for the SN.

Identify Status Tracking Information

The following configuration status information will be regularly tracked at the SN-architecture level:

  • Current SN Network Architecture
  • Inventory of Current Network Components
  • Open Change Requests
  • Closed Change Requests
  • Components Affected By Change Requests
  • Open Engineering Requests
  • Closed Engineering Requests

This information will enable the IT organization to monitor the SN architecture, to identify potential troublespots, and to plan potential enhancements.

At the component-level, the CFs will provide configuration status information for each individual SN component. This information will not normally be tracked at the organizational level, but can and should be made available in special circumstances.

Maintain Status Tracking

First-tier, architectural configuration status information will be recorded and maintained in a centralized repository; most typically some sort of database. This repository will contain the inventory of network components and their status, as well as the proposed and implemented changes to the network. Second-tier, component configuration status information will be recorded and maintained in the individual Configuration Folders. These folders may be hardcopy (e.g., a manila folder next to a hub) or electronic (e.g., a database containing all SN routers and their configuration). Regardless of their form, CFs must be easy for network personnel to access so that they may record what they did to the component at the same time they performed the action.

Since the configuration status information is crucial to ensuring the integrity of the SN baseline, its components, and the SN CM process, only authorized personnel should update this data. The SN CCB will identify the specific SN personnel authorized to update the status information changes and the specific changes that each person is authorized to make.

Report Status Tracking

Regular monitoring of the configuration status information will enable IT to identify trends and potential troublespots in the SN. Each IT organization and the SN CCB will determine the reports required for performing this analysis.

Configuration Reviews

Configuration reviews will be performed periodically to verify the correctness of the configuration status accounting information. The goal of a configuration review is to verify that all network components have been correctly identified and that all network changes have been properly managed. Periodic configuration reviews will also enable to assess the effectiveness of the SN CM process and to identify potential modifications. Proper configuration reviews answer the following questions:

  • Are the configuration status accounting records accurate and complete?
  • Does our configuration management process work effectively?

The major activities of a configuration review are:

  • Identifying the information to be reviewed and performing the review
  • Documenting and analyzing the results of the review

The following sections present the configuration status accounting activities for the SN.

Perform Configuration Review

Periodically, the configuration status information will be reviewed to verify its accuracy and completeness. The SN CCB will identify the configuration reviews to be performed. The following is a preliminary list of configuration reviews:

  • Physical Network Review

The Physical Network Review will analyze and note any discrepancies between the configuration status information and the physical SN network. This is a detailed review which compares the data in the repository and CFs with the actual physical configuration of the deployed network components. This review is roughly equivalent to the Physical Configuration Audit in traditional CM.

Document and Analyze Results

The results of the configuration review will be documented and made available to the SN CCB and SN IT organizations. These organizations will use the findings to identify and correct discrepancies in the configuration status information. In addition, the SN CCB should analyze inefficiencies and problems identified in the SN CM process and undertake to resolve them.

CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT PROCESS

This section presents the SN configuration management process. This process describes verbally and pictorially the CM activities and their flow. The activity descriptions provide adequate information to enable SN personnel to make CM decisions, but they are not written at the procedure level of detail.

Process Overview

The SN CM process consists of four phases:

  • Classification – An incident or change is identified and routed to the appropriate organization for resolution
  • Evaluation – An initial solution is identified. CM control is provided by either the SN Change Control Board (CCB) or Working Group (WG) depending on the nature of the proposed solution (component-only or SN architecture).
  • Modeling and Testing – If the proposed solution involves an architectural change, the change is modeled and tested to determine its effect on the existing SN architecture.
  • Implementation – The final solution is approved and deployed to the SN.

Figure 4-1 graphically presents a high-level overview of the SN CM process.


Figure 4-1. SN CM Process Overview

Classification is a triage phase. It begins when a SN incident or change is identified; typically, when the Help Desk receives a trouble report. Operation Group evaluates the report and determines whether it can resolve the incident itself (e.g., a modem needs to be reset) or whether the solution requires a change to the SN (e.g., a router configuration needs to be modified). If Operation Group resolves the incident itself, it updates the Component Folder (CF) to record its actions and the report is closed. If Operation Group cannot resolve the incident or it requires a change to SN, Operation Group originates an Engineering Request (ER) which formally transfers the incident to Architecture Group for resolution.

Evaluation is an analysis phase. It begins when Architecture Group receives an ER request from Operation Group (or any other SN organization) documenting an SN incident. Architecture Group analyzes the incident and identifies a potential solution. If the solution only involves minor changes to existing SN components, then Architecture Group presents the incident and solution to the SN WG for approval. If the solution involves significant component changes or SN architectural changes, then Architecture Group originates a Change Request (CR) and presents it to the SN CCB.

Modeling and Testing is a research phase. It begins when a CR is under consideration by the SN CCB. Architecture Group will model and test the potential solution to determine its impact on the SN. Other SN organizations will research the potential solution to determine its impact on their organizations. Each organization will document the results of its research using an Impact Assessment (IA). The SN CCB will use these IAs as the basis for approving or disapproving the potential solution.

Implementation is a deployment phase. It begins when the SN CCB or WG approves a solution. Architecture Group will implement the change and deploy it. If the change performs properly, Architecture Group creates and/or updates the Component Folders (CF) to record its actions and the ER or CR is closed.

The following sections discuss each phase in greater detail.

Classification

Classification begins when a SN incident or change is identified; typically, when the Help Desk receives a trouble report. The incident or change is documented in the trouble ticket system Operation Group evaluates the trouble ticket to determine whether it can resolve the incident itself or whether the solution requires a change to the SN. If Operation Group can resolve the incident itself and is authorized to do so (e.g., a modem needs to be reset), then Operation Group solves the incident, records its actions in the CFs, and closes the trouble ticket. If Operation Group cannot resolve the incident or is not authorized to do so (e.g., a router configuration needs to be modified) then it originates an ER and formally transfers the incident to Architecture Group for resolution. The flow then enters the Evaluation phase.

Figure 4-2 presents the activity flowchart for the Classification phase.


Figure 4-2. Classification Phase Activities

Evaluation

Evaluation begins when Architecture Group receives an ER request from Operation Group (or any other SN organization) documenting an SN incident. First Architecture Group determines if the ER is a valid request; then it analyzes the ER to determine the extent of its impact. Not all SN changes are major (e.g., replacement of a defective hub with a good hub of the same make and model) and may need only Architecture Group to effect the change. These minor changes will proceed directly to the Implementation phase. If the ER may require significant changes to the SN architecture or its components (e.g., a router needs to be reconfigured), then Architecture Group determines whether the potential solution requires SN architectural-level or component-level changes. A potential solution may require a combination of architectural and component-level changes; however if the potential solution involves any architectural considerations, then the entire incident shall be considered an architectural change.

For architectural-level changes, Architecture Group originates a CR and presents it to the SN CCB. Architecture Group also performs preliminary research to assist the CCB is determining whether the change is plausible. If the CCB disapproves the potential change, then the CR is closed and the flow ends; if the CCB decides that the potential change should be implemented, then the flow proceeds to the Implementation phase;

For component-level changes, Architecture Group performs preliminary research which it then presents to the SN WG. The WG reviews the incident and potential solution and determines whether the change is plausible. If the WG disapproves the potential change, then the CM process is exited; if the WG decides that the potential change should be implemented, then the flow proceeds to the Implementation phase.

Figure 4-3 presents an activity flowchart for the Evaluation phase.

Figure 4-3. Evaluation Phase Activities

Modeling and Testing

Modeling and Testing begins when a potential solution is under consideration by the SN CCB or WG. Architecture Group will develop and document a modeling or testing strategy, configure the evaluation environment, and execute the test. Data from the test will be analyzed and the impact on the SN documented using an IA. The Other SN organizations will also research the potential solution to determine its impact on their organizations. These organizations will also document their research using IAs.

The IAs form the basis of the SN CCB’s decision regarding the potential solution. The SN CCB will consider the test results, the impact on the SN, and any organizational effect and either approve or disapprove the solution. If the solution is approved, then the flow proceeds to the Implementation phase. If the solution is disapproved, then Architecture Group reevaluates the incident and potential solutions and the flow returns to the Evaluation phase.

Figure 4-4 presents an activity flowchart for the Modeling and Testing phase.

Implementation

Implementation begins when the SN CCB or WG approves a solution. Architecture Group will plan, execute, and deploy the change. Architecture Group will monitor, verify, and document that the change produces satisfactory results.

If the change performs properly, Architecture Group creates and/or updates the Component Folders (CF) and other SN documentation to record the new baseline. If SN personnel require new skills to support the change, Architecture Group will conduct training. The SN CCB will close the ER or CR and Operation Group will assume operational maintenance. The flow will end. If the change does not perform properly, then Architecture Group reevaluates the incident and potential solutions and the flow returns to the Evaluation phase.

Figure 4-5 presents an activity flowchart for the Implementation phase.


Figure 4-4. Modeling and Testing Phase Activities


Figure 4-5. Implementation Phase Activities

This section presents recommended activities to ensure successful implementation of the configuration management process described in this plan.

Plan SN CM Implementation

Implementation of the SN CM process requires numerous activities to be conducted across SN organizations. The SN CM Implementation Plan will help ensure that these transition activities are completed and that each SN organization is ready for transition to the SN CM process. In addition, this plan will help ensure that the transition is performed in an orderly and controlled fashion.

The SN CM Implementation Plan will:

  • Identify the implementation strategy
  • Identify the implementation activities for the SN organizations
  • Identify the implementation schedule
  • Identify training requirements

IT has already tasked development of this plan as a part of this task order.

Finalize SN Component Inventory

The SN component inventory forms the basis for the SN architecture baseline and the SN Component Folders. This inventory defines the scope of the entire CM process, therefore it is critical that this inventory be accurate and complete.

IT has already begun this activity. The Equipment List, and the Master Inventory of Wide Area Network Routers, provides a good basis for this inventory. IT should finish identifying SN network components and begin populating a centralized repository with the information.

Establish SN Component Folders

The SN Component Folders are an integral part of the SN CM process. Each SN component should have a CF identifying its configuration at deployment, its current configuration settings, and any actions performed on the component. Since the CFs are such a critical component of the SN CM process, the CFs must be in place before transitioning to this CM process.

Identify Candidate CM Tools

CM tools vary greatly in their capabilities and robustness. Some CM tools only provide version control (e.g., Unix’s SCCS); while other tools provide built-in workflow support for the entire CM process (e.g., PCMS). Before selecting any tools to support the SN CM process, IT should identify the areas of the SN CM process that would benefit from tool support (e.g., maintenance of the Component Folders). This will provide the basis for identifying requirements that quantify the support required. IT will then use these requirements to identify candidate CM tools and to evaluate their ability to support the SN CM process. It is strongly recommended that this requirements-based evaluation be performed before IT procures and deploys any CM tools to support the SN CM process.

Some tools used by previous network CM efforts include:

  • Continuus (Continuus)
  • ClearCase (Atria)
  • SA-EXPERTISE (Software Artistry)
  • Microsoft Access

Establish SN Change Control Board

The SN Change Control Board is an integral part of the SN CM process — without the SN CCB, there is no mechanism to control SN architectural changes. Establishment of the SN CCB enables all SN organizations to «buy-in» into the SN CM process and identifies unexpected organizational issues which must be resolved for the process to work successfully Since the SN CCB is such a critical component of the SN CM process, the CCB must be in place before transition to this process.

Train SN Personnel

This CM process changes current SN operations, maintenance, and engineering procedures; consequently, all SN personnel should be trained in the new CM process. Since people generally retain information better when they are required to use it, IT should consider conducting the training no more than 30 days prior to transition to the SN CM process.

IT has already tasked development of this training as a part of this task order.

APPENDIX A SAMPLE CM FORMS

SN ENGINEERING REQUEST

Control Number

Originator:     Name:                        Phone:

Organization:                    Date:

Incident Description:

Suggested Resolution:

Urgency:    High    Medium Low  Continuation Page

Analyst:     Name:                        Phone:

Organization:                    Date:

Analysis of Incident:

Recommended Resolution:

 Continuation Page

Resolution:    No Change    Component    Architectural (CR Number            )

Description:

Approved By:                            Date:

Figure A-1. Sample ENGINEERING REQUEST Form

SN CHANGE REQUEST

Control Number

Originator:     Name:                        Phone:

Organization:                    Date:

Description of Change:

Change Justification:

Preliminary Assessment:

Urgency:    High    Medium Low  Continuation Page

Impact Assessments

Architecture Group    IA Control Number:                Date:

Operation Group    IA Control Number:                Date:

Deployment Group    IA Control Number:                Date:


CCB Decision:

Approved    Rejected    Reinvestigate

Description:

CCB Chair:                                        Date:

Figure A-2. Sample CHANGE REQUEST Form

SN IMPACT ASSESSMENT

Control Number

CR Control Number:

Analyst:     Name:                        Phone:

Organization:                    Date:

Technical Analysis:

 Continuation Page

Schedule Impact:

 Continuation Page

Cost Impact:

 Continuation Page

Labor Impact:

 Continuation Page

Alternatives:

 Continuation Page

Approved By:                                Date:

Figure A-3. Sample IMPACT ASSESSMENT Form

APPENDIX B CHARTER TEMPLATES

template is derived from the CCB Charter outline presented in Cultivating Successful Software Development: A Practitioner’s View.

SN Configuration Control Board (CCB)

Charter Template

  1. CCB Purpose

The purpose of the SN Change Control Board is to ensure that the Switched Network changes and related programmatic changes (i.e., consideration of proposed cost and schedule changes) are processed in visible and traceable manner. The CCB is the forum in which SN participants get together to discuss what needs to be done, (2) responsible agents are assigned for performing agreed-upon work, and (3) decisions and assigned actions are recorded.

  1. CCB Membership

The SN CCB will be comprised of the following representatives from the IT Services Directorate:

  • Architecture Group — [TBD – identify representative(s) by name and/or title]
  • Operation Group — [TBD – identify representative(s) by name and/or title]
  • Deployment Group — [TBD – identify representative(s) by name and/or title]

Representatives from other organizations may be invited on an as-needed basis.

[TBD – identify by name and/or title] will be responsible for documenting the CCB meetings.

  1. CCB Chairperson

The SN CCB Chair is [TBD – identify by name and/or title]. The SN CCB Chair will manage the meeting in such a manner that input and discussion are encouraged from all attendees. Product and programmatic decision authority rests with the SN CCB Chair and is made a matter of record in the meeting documentation.

  1. CCB Activities

The SN CCB will meet every [TBD – specify frequency of CCB meetings, also specify any requirements for meeting notification, quorum of attendees, etc.]

The SN CCB will perform the following activities: [TBD – the following activities are presented as examples of the SN CCB activities to be included. This list should not be considered complete until it has been reviewed and approved by the IT organizations participating in the SN CCB]

  • Reviewing and managing proposed changes to the SN architecture.
  • Reviewing and managing cross-organizational SN issues
  • Reviewing and managing the SN configuration management process
  • Recording CCB minutes
  • Reviewing, approving, and, if necessary, recording changes to CCB minutes from the previous CCB meeting.
  1. CCB Meeting Documentation

The following information will be recorded for each CCB meeting: [TBD – the following items are presented as examples of the information to be included in the SN CCB minutes. This list should not be considered complete until it has been reviewed and approved by the IT organizations participating in the SN CCB]

  • Meeting date, time, and duration
  • List of attendees and their organizations
  • Items discussed
  • Existing action items
  • New action items
  • Decisions made

Связные и просто интересные записи:

Метки:activity, architect, change, chart, clearcase, CM, configuration, defect, diagram, it, loc, management, microsoft, ms, perl, plan, process, project, rational, req, request, software, standard, state, tools

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